APTOPIX Bill Cosby

Bill Cosby arrives for his sentencing hearing at the Montgomery County Courthouse, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018, in Norristown, Pa. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) — A defense psychologist testified at Bill Cosby's sentencing Tuesday that the chances of the comedian committing another sex offense are "extraordinarily low" because he is old, legally blind and needs help getting around.

Psychologist Timothy Foley took the stand as the 81-year-old TV star waited to learn his punishment for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman at his suburban Philadelphia estate in 2004.

The comic once known as America's Dad faced anywhere from probation to 10 years in prison after being convicted in April in the first celebrity trial of the #MeToo era.

Meanwhile, in a five-page statement submitted to the court, Cosby's victim, Andrea Constand, now 45, said the assault robbed her of her self-confidence and affects her to this day.

The former professional basketball player and Temple University basketball administrator said she now lives alone with her two dogs and has trouble trusting people.

"When the sexual assault happened, I was a young woman brimming with confidence and looking forward to a future bright with possibilities," she wrote. "Now, almost 15 years later, I'm a middle-aged woman who's been stuck in a holding pattern for most of her adult life, unable to heal fully or to move forward."

Cosby's lawyers called Foley to the stand as they fought to keep him from being declared a "sexually violent predator," which would make him subject to mandatory lifetime counseling and community notification.

Foley said the recidivism rate is negligible for sex offenders older than 70.

"Given that he's 81, blind, has been convicted of a sex offense and will be supervised," it's extremely unlikely Cosby would commit another such crime, Foley testified.

Defense attorney Joseph Green started the second day of Cosby's sentencing hearing by getting a psychologist for the state to acknowledge it is possible Cosby is in "full remission" from a psychological disorder she says gives him the uncontrollable urge to assault women.

Cosby hasn't been accused of committing a sexual assault in the 14 years since he violated Constand, who said the comedian gave her what she thought were herbal pills and then penetrated her with his fingers as she lay incapacitated on a couch.

Prosecutors on Monday asked a judge to give Cosby five to 10 years behind bars, while his lawyers asked for house arrest, saying the former TV star is too old and helpless to do time in prison.

Cosby was smiling and joking with his spokesman and sheriff's deputies as he settled into the courtroom Tuesday. On Day 1 of the sentencing, the comic laughed at times as the psychologist on the stand for the state portrayed him as a sexual predator with signs of a mental disorder.

Cameras were not allowed in the courtroom; they are generally banned in Pennsylvania.

Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt said the former TV star planned to remain silent when given the opportunity to address the court Tuesday. Cosby did not testify at either of his two trials.

In the years since Constand first went to authorities in 2005, more than 60 women have accused Cosby of sexual misconduct, though none of those claims have led to criminal charges.

The proceedings took place as another extraordinary #MeToo drama continued to unfold on Capitol Hill, where Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh faces allegations of sexual misconduct from more than three decades ago.

Tuesday's sentencing was a reckoning accusers and prosecutors said was decades in the making for the once-beloved entertainer known for his role as wise and understanding Dr. Cliff Huxtable on the top-ranked, 1980s-era "Cosby Show."

"The victims cannot be un-raped. Unfortunately, all we can do is hold the perpetrator accountable," said Gianna Constand, the victim's mother, who testified Monday that her daughter's buoyant personality was forever changed after the attack.

On Monday, Green urged Judge Steven O'Neill to ignore the protests and activism surrounding the case and send Cosby home.

"The suggestion that Mr. Cosby is dangerous is not supported by anything other than the frenzy," Green said as demonstrators gathered outside the courthouse.

Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele said Cosby would no doubt commit similar crimes if given the chance, warning that the former TV star seemingly gets a sexual thrill out of slipping women drugs and assaulting them.

"To say that he's too old to do that — to say that he should get a pass, because it's taken this long to catch up to what he's done?" Steele said, his voice rising. "What they're asking for is a 'get out of jail free' card."

The AP does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they come forward publicly, which Constand and other accusers have done.

Cosby became the first black actor to star in a prime-time TV show, "I Spy," in 1965. He remained a Hollywood A-lister for much of the next half-century.

Associated Press writer Claudia Lauer contributed to this report.